Opinion: Here at home: Putin’s Information War

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  • Eric Morris

    Isn’t this opinion piece very similar to what he describes Putin as doing? Hasn’t Crimea’s population been more Russian than Ukrainian, at least in contemporary times?According to wiki, that seems to be the case.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Crimea

    I hope I’m not considered one of Putin’s “useful idiots” for asking these questions. In my youth, we used to call 911 and scream the “Russians are coming.” I don’t do it anymore, even as I approach the age where Henry Hyde described his personal peccadilloes as being mere “youthful indiscretions”.

  • Kurt Stickler

    I have read your opinion pieces over the last several months in Current, and now feel compelled to respond. “Russia of Putin and the KGB,” I assume you mean FSB. Not sure why that would be a concern to anyone. We actually had a president who was formerly the head of the CIA. I don’t recall the Soviets getting all bent out of shape. “Making our nation better and military stronger,” …do you think our military is weak? We spend a whopping 4% of GDP on our military. There is not another country on Earth that has a military greater than ours and the next 25 defense budgets of the world do not add up to our total defense expenditures. That doesn’t include the secret expenditures of our State Department and CIA for regime change. Do you think we have not been engaged in the politics of others through hybrid warfare… have you ever heard of the supposed unfunded NGO’s, Color Revolutions, and Arab Spring? Did it ever occur to you that each of Russia’s moves was made to counter a move by us? How much more money do you want to spend on making our military greater, and for what purpose? We have already run roughshod over Afghanistan and Iraq. We sponsored regime change in Syria, Egypt, Libya, Serbia, Georgia, and Ukraine just to name a few. How many lives lost in each of those countries? Most NATO countries spend less than 2% on their defense. Perhaps they spend the money saved on healthcare for their citizens. We have two oceans and two friendly countries that border us. Do we really need more defense expenditures? I suppose there is just too much money to be made in war, and to justify those expenditures one needs a boogie man…a.k.a. Russia. Only because of Trump, is there a push to get NATO countries to the 2% spending level to the objections of many who live in Europe. Does that sound like Europe is afraid of Russia? NATO is an organization that has spread toward the Russian border, that has a 6:1 advantage in population, a 5:1 advantage in military personnel, and overwhelming advantages in aircraft, navel, and armor assets. This article sounds like the propaganda rags that NEWSWEEK and CNN have become. Your article would be better titled, “Morozov’s Mis-Information War” because you left out most of the story.

    • Eric Morris

      Thank you.

  • Kurt Stickler

    I just read this from the NEW YORK POST. It would appear that the DNC has more explaining to why they purposefully tried to implicate Russia. Members of VIPS (Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity) can be seen giving interviews on YouTube. VIPS’ members have well over a hundred years of working in our (United States) intelligence services.

    Foreign desk: US Ex-Spies Don’t Buy Russia Story
    “A group of former US spies, Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity, has been investigating whether the leaks of Democratic National Committee files were the result of Russian hacks. And Leonid Bershidsky at Bloomberg reports that “what they found instead is evidence to the contrary” — specifically, that “at least some of the DNC files were taken by an insider rather than by hackers,” in order to “fabricate evidence” the DNC “had been hacked by Russia” so as to “defuse” the WikiLeaks disclosures promised by Julian Assange. The findings are based on forensic findings suggesting the download speed was impossible from the Internet. VIPS, he notes, “includes former National Security Agency staffers with considerable technical expertise.” If they’re right, ignoring them could lead to “a dangerous failure to recognize that Donald Trump’s victory was an American phenomenon, not a Russian-made one.””