Category: Travel

Façade of Jaipur’s Palace of the Winds. (Photo by Don Knebel) 0

Column: Palace of the Winds

Jaipur, in northwest India, is known today as the “Pink City.” Ironically, its most famous pink structure was designed in service of modesty. Jaipur was a planned city, constructed between 1727 and 1733 by...

St. Isaac’s Cathedral from Neva River. (Photo by Don Knebel) 0

Column: St. Isaac’s deadly domes

The golden dome of St. Isaac’s Cathedral dominates the skyline of St. Petersburg, Russia. The massive church, said to be the third largest domed cathedral in the world, was built at an enormous cost...

Espionage Tunnel in Berlin’s Allied Museum. (Photo by Don Knebel) 0

Column: Berlin’s clandestine tunnel

Berlin’s Allied Museum collects and displays items from 1948 to 1990, when the city was divided between East and West. The museum’s most fascinating item reflects western espionage activities during the Cold War. The...

Interior of Pantheon in Rome (Photo by Don Knebel) 0

Column: Rome’s heavenly dome

The largest unreinforced dome in the world is also the oldest. Most Americans unknowingly see the lasting influence of this extraordinary achievement of Roman architects every day. In about 126 A.D., Roman Emperor Hadrian...

Noria in Hama, Syria in November 2010 (Photo by Don Knebel) 0

Column: Wheels in Jeopardy

Hama, in northwestern Syria, is (or at least was until recently) one of the most picturesque cities in the Middle East. Much of Hama’s special appeal comes from 17 ancient norias (“wheels of pots”)...

Stairs to Nile in Church in Ma’adi, Egypt (Photo by Don Knebel) 0

Column: The Holy Family in Egypt

Western Christians seeking sites associated with Jesus’ birth usually go to Bethlehem, where the Bible says Jesus was born. Egyptian Christians (“Coptics”) are more likely to seek out sacred sites in Egypt. According to...

Windmill and cannon in Kastellet. (Photo by Don Knebel) 1

Column: War and Peace in Copenhagen

Copenhagen’s Kastellet (“Citadel”) may be the most beautiful active military base in the world. It is also the site of a unique religious tradition and a great choice for an afternoon stroll. In 1626,...

Manneken Pis in Brussels, Belgium. (Photo by Don Knebel) 0

Column: Brussels’ Fountain of Youth

Many first-time visitors to Brussels, Belgium, immediately seek out its most famous symbol, a statue named “Manneken Pis,” Dutch for “little boy pee.” This irreverent two-foot-tall statue may explain why Brussels is often called...

Praying at the Western Wall (Photo by Don Knebel) 0

Column: Jerusalem’s Holy Wall

A section of a 2,000-year-old wall is the world’s holiest place for many Jews, providing one reason why determining the future of East Jerusalem is so difficult. In 19 B.C., Judea’s King Herod began...