Small business owners react to the Anti-discrimination ordinance

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A sign on the door of Holy Family Books and Gifts reads, “Respect religious freedom.” (Photo by Adam Aasen)

A sign on the door of Holy Family Books and Gifts reads, “Respect religious freedom.” (Photo by Adam Aasen)

OPPOSES ORDINANCE

Melanie Burosh, owner of Holy Family Books and Gifts

1327 S. Range Line Road

Prominently displayed on her front door is a sign that reads, “Respect Religious Freedom.” Melanie Burosh owns the store in Carmel with her husband, Don, and she said she doesn’t discriminate against anyone who walks through her doors, but she opposes the proposed anti-discrimination ordinance because she doesn’t think the government should make laws restricting religious freedom. At the same time, she said she sells her religious gifts and items to many gay customers.

“It’s not really my place to judge people or to tell them I won’t sell to them,” she said. “Personally, I don’t think that’s the right thing to do.”

SUPPORTS ORDINANCE

Jeanne Shirley, owner of Painting with a Twist

301 E. Carmel Dr.

Along with her husband Bryan, Jeanne Shirley owns a Carmel location of the national franchise Painting with a Twist that offers art classes with wine. Her location recently hosted a Marriage Equality Night where attendees could paint a tree with rainbow leaves. Being connected to artists, Shirley said she meets people of all types and she thinks businesses should never discriminate against customers because of who they are.

“I think the ordinance is a good idea,” she said. “It’s never a good idea to treat people differently.”

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